Metabolic syndrome is associated with faster decline in kidney function

Tor Nyborg Stefansson has used data from the Tromsø study to study the links between obesity, albuminuria, metabolic syndrome and glomerular filtration rate decline.


MAIN RESULTS:

  1. People with high cardiovascular risk have accelerated decline in kidney function.

THESIS DEFENCE:

Thesis: Obesity, renal hyperfiltration and glomerular filtration rate decline in the general population
Candidate: Vidar Tor Nyborg Stefansson
Time: June 11, 2019 at 12:15
Place: UiT The Arctic University of Norway, MH-Vest: Auditorium Cortex
Link to university website


SUMMARY:

(1) The metabolic syndrome associates with accelerated glomerular filtration rate decline, indicated a more rapid decline in kidney function among persons at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Glomerular filtration rate was measured accurately in 1627 men and women who participated in the Renal Iohexol Clearance Survey as a part of their participation in the Tromsø 6 Study from 2007 to 2009. The measurements were repeated in 1324 of the same persons from 2013 to 2015.

(1/2) In two other papers, Stefansson and his co-workers have found associations between obesity and increased glomerular filtration rate, as well as between increased albuminuria and increased glomerular filtration rate. The elevated kidney function in obesity indicates hyperfiltration that might stress and damage the kidneys in the long term.


REFERENCES:

(1) Stefansson, V. T. N., Schei, J., Jenssen, T. G., Melsom, T., & Eriksen, B. O. (2016). Central obesity associates with renal hyperfiltration in the non-diabetic general population: a cross-sectional studyBMC nephrology17(1), 172.

(2) Melsom, T., Stefansson, V., Schei, J., Solbu, M., Jenssen, T., Wilsgaard, T., & Eriksen, B. O. (2016). Association of increasing GFR with change in albuminuria in the general population. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology11(12), 2186-2194.